Posts

July 23, 2014

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6:43 PM | How to Steal a Soviet Lunar Probe
In the mid-60s, the Soviet Union staged an international exhibition to showcase the achievements of Communism to westerners. Included in the exhibition was a never-flown, production version of one of the USSR's Luna moon probes. This io9 article details the caper, but The National Security Archive has a declassified version of the original report as well as several other fascinating declassified documents, including details about the Navy's attempts to use the Moon for untraceable communication.
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6:38 PM | The birth of topological spintronics
The discovery of a new material combination that could lead to a more efficient approach to computer memory and logic is the first promising indication that it may be possible to build a practical technology with a novel material known as a 'topological insulator'. The research team's results show that such a scheme can be 10 times more efficient for controlling magnetic memory or logic than any other combination of materials measured to date.
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6:37 PM | Timelapse of Tide Change at Tutka Bay, Alaska
GoPro Timelapse (July 14, 2014) of the change from ultra-low-tide to high-tide at Tutka Bay, Alaska.The post Timelapse of Tide Change at Tutka Bay, Alaska appeared first on Stay Curious.
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6:34 PM | Thought experiment wednesday: Kavka’s toxin
Suzie, after flawlessly predicting our every action in our last competition, decides she wants to play another game. As we have already established that Suzie is an unrelenting psychopath, it does not surprise you that she holds in her hand an extremely debilitating (but nonlethal!) toxin.  You briefly ponder how Suzie could possibly derive enjoyment […] The post Thought experiment wednesday: Kavka’s toxin appeared first on The Berkeley Science Review.
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6:32 PM | Does Your Dog Feel Jealous, Or Is That A Purely Human Flaw?
Dog owners don't doubt that their pooch has feelings. But scientists aren't so sure. An experiment found that dogs act upset, dare we say jealous, when their owners ignore them for a stuffed animal.
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6:32 PM | Salvador Dumbo
I’ve spoken before about how YouTube and the explosion of camera phones has given animal behaviour researchers a a way of quantifying behaviour that is rarely seen, or would once have been thought of as anecdotal. Well here’s a short … Continue reading →
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6:31 PM | Wide-Faced Men Negotiate Nearly $2,200 Larger Signing Bonus
Having a wider face helps men when they negotiate for […]
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6:28 PM | Sleep Deprivation May Increase Susceptibility to False Memories
Not getting enough sleep may increase the likelihood of forming […]
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6:27 PM | Gene inhibitor, salmon fibrin restore function lost in spinal cord injury
A therapy combining salmon fibrin injections into the spinal cord […]
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6:26 PM | Study links enzyme to autistic behaviors
Fragile X syndrome (FXS) is a genetic disorder that causes […]
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6:26 PM | How diamonds and lasers can recreate Jupiter’s...
How diamonds and lasers can recreate Jupiter’s core Understanding what the insides of the biggest planets in the universe has been largely wrapped up in theories.  Now scientists at Lawrence Livermore National Lab have recreated these conditions with the help of diamonds and the world’s largest laser: Though diamond is the least compressible material known, the researchers were able to compress it to an unprecedented density, greater than lead at ambient conditions. The hope […]
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6:15 PM | Bat-Pterodactyls
Italian Cosimo Alessandro Collini (1727-1806), at the time chairman of the Cabinet of Curiosities of the principality of Pfalz (Germany), was the first naturalist to speculate about pterodactyls in 1784. Fig.1. Pterodactylus antiquus (Upper Jurassic, Eichstätt, Bavaria), specimen studied by Cosimo Collini in 1784 and copper engraving of the fossil to illustrate his scientific study [...]
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6:15 PM | Bat-Pterodactyls
Italian Cosimo Alessandro Collini (1727-1806), at the time chairman of the Cabinet of Curiosities of the principality of Pfalz (Germany), was the first naturalist to speculate about pterodactyls in... -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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6:15 PM | Plane Crash In Taiwan Kills Dozens, Leaving Some Survivors
A Taiwanese domestic flight that was attempting to land in bad weather related to a strong typhoon crashed near the runway Wednesday on an island off Taiwan's western coast.
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6:12 PM | Taking it Slowly
It’s summer now, and as air conditioners hum and fans turn while the electric meter spins, energy is a hot topic. This is especially true in my home state of Ohio, which recently made renewable energy history by rolling back support for renewable energy standards (making history is not always a good thing). Ohio is […]
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6:08 PM | University nanotechnology spinout developing revolutionary battery technology
A UCF spinout company is at the forefront of perfecting specialized nanotechnology designed to extend the longevity of batteries and superconductors. Batteries will be lighter, stay charged longer and need to be replaced less frequently - and that's a win for our smart phones and our environment.
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6:07 PM | Nursing Announcements, Accolades and Presentations, July 2014
Click here to read more about presentations and awards from across the UCM nursing community.
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6:04 PM | Working from coffee shops could be destroying your productivity. Here’s why.
A few weeks ago, my wife and I dropped into a coffee shop that we’d been meaning to try. It was a trendy hipster spot, and on that day, the plaid shirts outnumbered the available tables, so we took a seat at a big wooden communal table in the middle of the room. Now normally, […] The post Working from coffee shops could be destroying your productivity. Here’s why. appeared first on Home Office Hero.
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6:04 PM | EID Journal: H3N2v Swine To Human Transmission At Agricultural Fairs – 2012
    # 8860   I hadn’t planned on writing another swine variant influenza-related blog again so soon (see yesterday’s blog CDC: Measures to Minimize Influenza Transmission at Swine Exhibitions, 2014), but today the CDC’s EID Journal has posted an analysis of the 2012 outbreak of H3N2v associated with attendance of agricultural fairs in Ohio in 2012.   Although only 19 swine variant flu infections were reported last year,  in 2012 more […]
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6:03 PM | This Aspiring Astronaut Might Be The World's Most Amazing Teen
He lived in a village in Tanzania. He dreamed of being an astronaut. Now he's studying in a Florida flight academy — and hoping his secret potato salad recipe will bring support to pay the tuition.
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6:00 PM | Hybrid Nanowires And A Crystal Wedding In The Nanocosmos
Researchers have succeeded in embedding nearly perfect semiconductor crystals into a silicon nanowire. They say the new method of producing hybrid nanowires, very fast and multi-functional processing units, can be accommodated on a single chip in the future.  Nano-optoelectronics are considered the cornerstone of future chip technology, but the research faces major challenges: on the one hand, electronic components must be accommodated into smaller and smaller spaces. On the other hand, […]
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6:00 PM | One Human Behavior Triggers Dog Jealousy Most
Want to drive your dog into a jealous rage? Shower another dog with attention. Continue reading →
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5:58 PM | Schadenfreude starts young
Children as young as 2 years old feel joy at another’s misfortune, new research suggests, showing jealousy’s deep roots.
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5:56 PM | Bombs for Butterflies
By Jason Bittel I’m here to tell you about a weapon that could change the world. It’s small, inexpensive, and easy to conceal. Discharging it in public wouldn’t harm any living creature; it wouldn’t even land you in jail. What it would do, believe it or not, is save millions of lives. Butterfly lives. Brothers and sisters, I speak of the milkweed seed bomb: a golf-ball-size grenade of dirt, clay and seeds that might just help […]
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5:51 PM | Interactive Patient Care Conference Visitors Tune Into UCM’s Get Well Network
The University of Chicago Medicine’s on-demand patient TV system garnered a prime-time audience of visiting nurses and hospital leaders during a trip to the Center for Care and Discovery.
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5:44 PM | Researcher as Teenager: Parsing Danah Boyd’s It’s Complicated
I have a distinct tendency to see everything through the lens of what it means for research communities. I have just finally read Danah Boyd’s It’s Complicated a book that focuses on how and why U.S. teenagers interact with and through social media. The book is well worth reading for the study itself, but I would argue it is more worth reading for the way it challenges many of the assumptions we make about how social interactions online and how they are mediated by […]
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5:41 PM | Wind Turbines Provide Feeding Opportunities for Wildlife
Scientists at the University of St Andrews have discovered that offshore pipelines and wind turbines can provide new feeding opportunities for the wildlife population in the area.
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5:40 PM | Cultural Competence Training Sessions Set For Fall
A new six-session course on cultural competence is being offered to all employees in a new effort to advance the University of Chicago Medicine’s commitment to diversity and inclusion. The training is part of the five-year, enterprise-wide strategic plan.
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5:36 PM | Schadenfreude starts young
Children as young as 2 feel joy at another’s misfortune, showing jealousy’s deep roots Gory DetailsPsychology by Erika Engelhaupt 1:58pm, July 23, 2014 PLEASURE IN PAIN  The word is German, but the feeling of schadenfreude is universal. Even two-year-olds showed joy in another’s misfortune during a recent study.ia_64/ISTOCKPHOTOJust like us adults, […]
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5:33 PM | Cardiology researcher who admitted to fraud earns four-year funding ban
A researcher who admitted in 2012 to “intentional and systematic manipulation” of data and had two papers retracted has been banned from funding by the German Research Foundation (DFG). Dennis Rottländer, who will also be returning prize money he was awarded for the research, worked in Uta C. Hoppe’s lab at the University of Cologne. […]
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