Posts

August 20, 2014

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4:16 PM | Teenagers need Exercise & Sunshine: Vitamin D Supplements Recommended
The television commercials of tanned, active young men and women enjoying outdoors activities, especially the beach, effectively compel us to warmer climates during the winter months. When skies are cloudy, temperatures are cool, and conditions can be downright wet or cold, people yearn to feel the sun warming their bodies. It feels good. It is good because vitamin D supports bone and muscle health. Especially important for teenagers.
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4:02 PM | Canadian Mars Analogue Mission: Field Report, Week 1
Tanya Harrison reports on Canada's efforts to simulate a Mars sample return mission here on Earth.
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4:00 PM | Crowdsourcing Competitions Often Hijacked: Study
By Charis Palmer, The ConversationCrowdsourcing competitions, popular with companies seeking to tap into groups of knowledge, are often diminished by malicious behaviour, according to a new study.The research, published today in the Journal of the Royal Society Interface, found the opennesss of crowdsourced competitions, particularly those with a “winner takes all” prize, made them vulnerable to attack. read more
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4:00 PM | RNA-targeted drug candidate for Lou Gehrig’s disease found  
By targeting RNA molecules that tangle and clump in the […]
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4:00 PM | I Can See Clearly Now.
DigitalGlobe company has launched the most powerful commercial imager ever built, the WorldView-3 Earth into orbit. DigitalGlobe’s images are used by Google and Bing maps, along with a host of other military and civilian applications. The WorldView-3 spacecraft has an astonishing 1.2 inches (31cm) resolution. The US Department of Commerce has restricted the distribution of … Continue reading →
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4:00 PM | Study puts numbers to post-baby sleepiness
Many moms aren’t getting good sleep months after giving birth, reports a new study and every mother ever.
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4:00 PM | Nice Art and Science example - UC Davis Medical School molecule sculpture
Quikc post here.  A month or so ago I went to the UC Davis Medical School in Sacramento for a meeting and got to see this amazing new sculpture for the first time.For more about this and the Artist Roger Berry see this article.  It is always inspiring and uplifting to see nice architecture and nice art in a science building.  -------- This is from the "Tree of Life Blog" of Jonathan Eisen, an evolutionary biologist and Open Access advocate at the University of California, […]
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4:00 PM | How many motors can NASA cram on its fryer-oil flier?
NASA's grease-fuelled hybrid aircraft seems to have been inspired by a magical movie car
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3:59 PM | New shock-and-kill approach could eradicate barrier to curing HIV
Despite tremendous progress in combatting HIV-1 infection with antiretroviral therapy, […]
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3:56 PM | Freeways as fences, trapping the mountain lions of Los Angeles
That mountain lions have managed to survive at all in […]
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3:56 PM | Instant Noodles Tied to Heart Risk
Women who ate instant noodles at least twice a week were 68 percent more likely to have metabolic syndrome.
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3:55 PM | Targeted brain training may help you multitask better  
The area of the brain involved in multitasking and ways […]
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3:53 PM | Researchers find security flaws in backscatter X-ray scanners
A team of researchers from the University of California, San […]
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3:52 PM | A semi-artificial leaf faster than natural photosynthesis
A cooperation between chemists and biologists from the Ruhr-University Bochum […]
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3:46 PM | Abusive leadership infects entire team
Supervisors who are abusive to individual employees can actually throw […]
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3:45 PM | Futile ICU Care Prevents Other Patients From Getting Treatment
In a bygone era, doctors thought every life was important. Treatment was aggressive and persistent in intensive care units even when it might be futile.  In the 21st century world, resources are the first consideration, and there are plenty of ideas about ways to curb treatment and lower costs. A new analysis finds that doctors could try a little less in the intensive care unit - because otherwise they are causing other ill patients needing medical attention to wait for critical care […]
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3:45 PM | Seeing a molecule breathe: Vibrational motion of a single molecule measured in real time
For the first time, chemists have succeeded in measuring vibrational […]
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3:45 PM | Our Curiosity
I haven’t written about our laser-eyed nuclear-powered red-planet roaming friend in a while. But the Curiosity rover recently celebrated its second year on Mars (which is really just over one Martian year on Mars). It’s still rolling along—literally—heading for its ultimate target: Aeolis Mons, aka Mount Sharp, the 5.5 kilometer-high peak in the center of Gale Crater, Curiosity's landing site. Of course, it’s finding a lot of fun souvenirs along the way, and doing […]
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3:45 PM | In Brief: How Long Will Your CDs Last?
Media archiving is a noble yet labored pursuit, as archivists struggle to find and adopt new technologies and mediums that won't go obsolete. We've previously discussed the US Library of Congress's approach to archiving millions of pieces of video. Back in the 90s all sorts of analog media was being transferred to what was then thought to be an enduring platform: the compact disc. NPR's All Things Considered recently interviewed the LoC's head of Preservation, Research, and Testing Division to […]
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3:41 PM | Severe infections with hospitalization after prostate biopsy rising in Sweden
Risk of urinary tract infections after prostate biopsy highest in […]
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3:40 PM | Continuing the battle for open access that’s good for science, not publishers’ profits
Two developments since the last post regarding open access things for anyone interested! First, is a little interview I had with the Open Access Button folk about er, open access: http://blog.openaccessbutton.org/2014/08/19/every-time-you-hit-a-paywall-thats-a-publisher-announcing-that-their-role-is-to-prohibit-the-progress-of-science-as-much-as-possible/ Second, is that our open letter to the AAAS has spawned a second one addressed to the Society for Neuroscience, led by Erin […]
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3:40 PM | Scientists learn more about rare skin cancer that killed Bob Marley
Cancer Research UK scientists have discovered that acral melanomas – […]
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3:40 PM | Did You Know There Are Tests For Sarcasm Detection?
And that was not a sarcastic question. If you're feeling at all unsure about your ability to tell the difference between sarcasm and straightforward statements, learn all about the tests designed for just that.Read more...
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3:39 PM | Half The World's Languages May Be Endangered
What happens when the last person to speak a language dies?
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3:39 PM | Astronomers Capture Spectacular NGC 3576, NGC 3603
A group of astronomers using the Wide Field Imager at ESO’s La Silla Observatory has captured an image of two intriguing and beautiful star formation regions in our Milky Way Galaxy known as NGC 3603 and NGC 3576. NGC 3576, also known as the Statue of Liberty Nebula and ESO 129-EN5, was discovered by John [...]
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3:38 PM | Conditional probability is hard -- but teaching it *shouldn't* be!
So, consider these two problems:  A. Which is more difficult? B. Which is it easier to teach someone to do correctly? My answers: BAYES is more difficult but also easier to each someone to do correctly.  Does that seem plausible to you? I won't be surprised if you say no, particularly if your answer reflects experience in seeing how poorly people do with conditional probability problems. But if you disagree with me, I do want to challenge your sense of what the problem is Okay, so […]
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3:37 PM | Studying Stream Restoration
By Marguerite Huber When I was younger, there was a prairie and stream behind my house. I ran and played there all the time with my friends until a house was built in its place. The lot was transformed from a wild, overgrown landscape to a manicured lawn. With the prairie gone and stream no […]
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3:34 PM | Científicos: ¿villanos o héroes?
Por Martín Bonfil OliveraDirección General de Divulgación de la Ciencia, UNAMPublicado en Milenio Diario, 20 de agosto  de 2014La profesión de científico ha tenido siempre una mala percepción pública.El científico es percibido a través de dos estereotipos. Uno es ridículo: el viejito canoso, despeinado tipo Einstein, distraído, sabio y bonachón, que más que científico es un […]
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3:34 PM | Crowd-control policing in the US is stuck in riot mode
Protest policing in the US adheres to outdated, aggressive tactics that only deepen tensions. There is a better way, says Michael Bond
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3:31 PM | If I have seen further than others it is because I have a bloody big microscope
Advanced microscopy has emerged as a powerful tool in microbiology. Here's why. Continue reading →
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