Posts

September 19, 2014

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1:54 PM | Stricter rules will thwart Japan's whaling attempts
From now on, Japan will have to work much harder to convince the world that its "scientific whaling" should be allowed to continue
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1:51 PM | Bayer's MaterialScience Spinoff
Plastics Today is reporting that Bayer is spinning off their materials science business, which include polyurethanes and their monomers, and also polycarbonates. There had been rumors for awhile that Bayer was going along this path, but I always figured someone would buy the business rather than have it spun-off.I've never been party to a spin-off, rather I've been on the "spinning" side. While there are certain advantages (the company has more independence and can seek capital from a multitude […]
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1:50 PM | Louisiana’s Boot Is Shrinking in Size
By Susan Cosier When learning the states as I child, I always remembered Louisiana as the “boot-shaped” one. But as you can see in the illustration on the right, the sole of that boot is wearing thin as the Gulf coastline disappears, thanks to oil and gas drilling, canal channeling, and sea-level rise (see "Losing Lousiana"). Between 1932 and 2000 the state lost nearly 1,900 square miles of land, and an area the size of a football field […]
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1:48 PM | Problems with Bargh’s definition of unconscious
I have a new paper out in Frontiers in Psychology: The perspectival shift: how experiments on unconscious processing don’t justify the claims made for them. There has been ongoing consternation about the reliability of some psychology research, particularly studies which make claims about unconscious (social) priming. However, even if we assume that the empirical results […]
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1:34 PM | Between Stiglitz and Selfies
#LindauEcon14 participant Muslimin Anwar shares a conversation with Joe Stiglitz and a host of spectacular Lindau selfies. It’s been four weeks since the closing of the 5th Lindau Meeting on Economic Sciences, but the great memory of it is still playing around in my head. For about a week, from 19 to 23 August 2014, […]
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1:31 PM | Il mio Pianeta dallo Spazio
My Planet from Space: Fragility and Beauty A phytoplankton bloom swirls in the South Atlantic Ocean about 600 km east of the Falkland Islands in this image from the European Space Agency (ESA) Envisat satelllite. Image Credit: ESA Il mio Pianeta dallo Spazio: Fragilità e Bellezza, or My Planet from Space: Fragility and Beauty, is […]
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1:30 PM | Economics paper retracted for plagiarism after citing its twin
As we’ve pointed out before, economics and business journals have few retractions compared with the other academic literature. Opinions vary on why this is, but the fact that only a few journals have plagiarism policies can’t help. Research Papers in Economics, or RePEc, an organization that maintains a database of economics papers, however, thoroughly investigates […]
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1:30 PM | Nearly 600 Years of Tree Rings Show Altered Ocean Habitat
Data records spanning almost 600 years have shown that the strength of coastal upwelling off the west coast of North America has become more variable since 1950.
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1:20 PM | You Know About A Supernova. What About An "Unnova"?
The supernova is a well-publicized and frightening phenomenon. There's also a phenomenon known as an "unnova." You don't want it in your backyard any more than you want a supernova.Read more...
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1:08 PM | Friday SNPpets
Welcome to our Friday feature link collection: SNPpets. During the week we come across a lot of links and reads that we think are interesting, but don’t make it to a blog post. Here they are for your enjoyment… RT @girlscientist: Will be watching! RT @ivanoransky: A new partner for Retraction Watch: PRE (Peer Review Evaluation) […]
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1:08 PM | Gaze-tracker lets you connect to devices with a glance
A headset computer that knows where you're looking can connect you to your devices or to other people with just a look and a nod
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1:02 PM | What does CNN have in common with Carmen Reinhart, Kenneth Rogoff, and Richard Tol: They all made foolish, embarrassing errors that would never have happened had they been using R Markdown
Rachel Cunliffe shares this delight: Had the CNN team used an integrated statistical analysis and display system such as R Markdown, nobody would’ve needed to type in the numbers by hand, and the above embarrassment never would’ve occurred. And CNN should be embarrassed about this: it’s much worse than a simple typo, as it indicates […] The post What does CNN have in common with Carmen Reinhart, Kenneth Rogoff, and Richard Tol: They all made foolish, embarrassing […]
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1:00 PM | Stuff online, endless waves edition
This week, at Nothing in Biology Makes Sense! Can we make the future more prosperous and healthy by steering evolution? And, at The Molecular Ecologist: A genomic scan for adaptation that probably misses a lot of the genome. Hope Jahren … Continue reading →
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1:00 PM | Announcement: “Integrative oncology” – Really the best of both worlds?
One of our goals here at SBM is to do more than just blog about the issues of science and pseudoscience in medicine that are our raison d’être. We also want to publish our science-based critiques in the peer-reviewed medical literature. Our first crack at this was an article by Steve Novella and myself published […]
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1:00 PM | How NASA's Microbe Detection Technology May Speed Up Tissue Transplants
Mining for Microbes AlloSource employees work in the microbiology lab AlloSource What do the Curiosity rover and a bone allograft have in common? They both have got to be super duper clean. That’s why AlloSource, a Colorado-based nonprofit that specializes in human tissue donation, has signed a Space Act Agreement with NASA and its Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL), to make sure their tissue samples are as germ-free as possible. One of the largest […]
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12:31 PM | FLUMP – ESA Baltimore, regime shifts, the sixth extinction and more
It’s Friday and that means that it’s time for our Friday link dump, where we highlight some recent papers (and . . .
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12:30 PM | Quickies: Planetary protection officer, giant squid dissection, and Wonder Woman
Categories: QuickiesMeet NASA’s one and only planetary protection officer – “Her job is to ensure that NASA and other U.S. organizations that journey into space adhere to the regulations put in ...(Read more...)
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12:30 PM | Open Science News – 19 September 2014
This week’s buzz in Open Science: Introducing OpenTrons: easy to use biotech tools that you can connect together to make a modular lab automation system so you can do more science than ever before! Looking for tips on how to write a winning grant? Check out these sample applications and summary statements provided [...]
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12:28 PM | Startup scales up graphene production, develops biosensors and supercapacitors (w/video)
An official of a materials technology and manufacturing startup based on a Purdue University innovation says his company is addressing the challenge of scaling graphene production for commercial applications.
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12:23 PM | How To Be a Science Denier
This Week Louisiana Governor Bobby Jindal gave an excellent lesson on how to be a science denier. Unfortunately, this was not a faux demonstration, he was sincere. If you recall, in 2012, Jindal advised Republicans to stop being “the stupid party.” This was a provocative statement. I wondered at the time if this signaled a shift [...]
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12:18 PM | an ISBA tee-shirt?!
 Sonia Petrone announced today at BAYSM’14 that a competition was open for the design of an official ISBA tee-shirt! The deadline is October 15 and the designs are to be sent to Clara Grazian, currently at CEREMADE, Université Dauphine [that should be enough to guess her email!]. I will most certainly submit my mug design. […]
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12:15 PM | Fluffy Friday – Fluffy Gets Fluffier
I wasn’t sure when to post about this, but I’m much too excited to wait. The Fluffy Sciences family is growing by one this month, as I prepare to adopt this little lady. I will post more about her in … Continue reading →
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12:14 PM | Was There an 'Early Modern' Period in Indian Philosophy?
Justin E.H. Smith at berfrois: If philosophy questions everything, surely it must also question the periodization of its own history. Professional historians themselves tend to agree that the imposition of periods on the past –premodern, Renaissance, early modern, and so...
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12:11 PM | Impressionism Into Modernism in america
Natasha Geiling at The Smithsonian Magazine: To be considered a serious artist in late-19th-century America, you had to have studied in a European, academic workshop, testing your brushtrokes among the masters of the continent. But art is nothing if not...
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12:04 PM | oliver sacks loves libraries
Oliver Sacks at Threepenny Review: When I was a child, my favorite room at home was the library, a large oak-paneled room with all four walls covered by bookcases—and a solid table for writing and studying in the middle. It...
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12:00 PM | Translational Findings: What drunk fruit flies can tell us about alcohol addiction
A study in 2012 found that approximately 7.2% of adults in the United States have an alcohol use disorder (a term that covers any person for whom their drinking causes distress or harm). That adds up to approximately 17 million Americans! Treatments for alcoholism, such as behavioral therapies or medications, can often be ineffective in […]

Shohat-Ophir G., R. Azanchi, H. Mohammed & U. Heberlein (2012). Sexual Deprivation Increases Ethanol Intake in Drosophila, Science, 335 (6074) 1351-1355. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1126/science.1215932

Lee H.G., Jennifer S. Dunning & Kyung-An Han (2008). Recurring Ethanol Exposure Induces Disinhibited Courtship in Drosophila, PLoS ONE, 3 (1) e1391. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0001391

Devineni A.V. (2009). Preferential Ethanol Consumption in Drosophila Models Features of Addiction, Current Biology, 19 (24) 2126-2132. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.cub.2009.10.070

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12:00 PM | Polyploidy and the evolution of flax
A previous and hitherto unknown whole-genome duplication event also occurred in cultivated flax 20–40 MYA.
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12:00 PM | Friday Roundup: The Week's Wildlife Links (September 19th, 2014)
First of all, did you catch Jonathan Hakim's awesome four-part guest post series this week about python conservation in Bangladesh? You must. Start here. Rare mussels return to Alabama and Tennessee after long absence. Chinook Salmon spotted above Giles Canyon, Washington. First time seen in Upper Elwha River in over 100 years. A must read: what is wildlife really worth to
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11:58 AM | Anatomy of an earthquake
Institute of Hazard, Risk and Resilience Blog - Making a difference to how we live with hazard and risk. In this video geologist Professor Iain Stewart gives a fantastic overview of what happens to a seismic hazard deep below the Earth’s surface and how it affects a vulnerable population above it. He also explains what can be done to [...] The post Anatomy of an earthquake appeared first on Institute of Hazard, Risk and Resilience Blog.
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11:58 AM | Zoologger: Ants fight dirty in turf war with spiders
In the forests of eastern Australia, a squadron of social spiders faces off against an army of the world's most dangerous ants in a pitched battle for survival
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