Posts

October 01, 2014

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1:28 PM | How Dream Coordinators at Schools Help Students Reach Goals
Investing in just one staff person to help students identify their aspirations and pave the way for them to reach those goals can have a big effect on a high school. [[ This is a content summary only. Visit my website for full links, other content, and more! ]]
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12:20 PM | September Pieces Of My Mind #2
Did I just tell the students that “polysemic” refers to people who donate repeatedly to sperm banks? Surely not? In mid-70s Dungeons & Dragons, players would often bring their characters from one dungeon master and gaming group to another, effectively skipping between worlds. Unheard of in Swedish 80s and 90s gaming. Annoying: seeing that the…
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12:00 PM | America’s pronghorn migration faces human obstacles
When you think of the planet’s greatest migrations, perhaps you think of the annual trek of the wildebeest through Africa’s Mara ecosystem, or the salty trails of the sperm whales, oceanic giants who feed in the waters of the frigid poles but mate in the warm tropics. Maybe you imagine the four generations it takes
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11:30 AM | Guillermo González Camarena...
Source: Antonio Toriz's blogGuillermo González Camarena invented an early color television system. He received US patent 2296019 on September 15, 1942 for his "chromscopic adapter for television equipment". [1]He was born on February 17, 1917 in Guadalajara, Jalisco. At two years of age, his family moved to Mexico City. Ever since he was young, he liked building electric toys, for which he established a laboratory in the basement of his house. In 1930 he enrolled in the School of […]
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11:26 AM | Using our posts as course material? Please tell us just so we know.
We’re aware of a number of courses at college and universities around the world that have used our posts as course material. But I suspect there are many more we don’t know about. We like to know about this just … Continue reading →
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11:00 AM | Carving Tunnels...
Source: Link for Technology Review followsTECHNOLOGY REVIEW: A new technique for creating pipes and tunnels deep inside silicon chips could change the way engineers make microfluidic machines and optoelectronic devices.One of the enabling technologies of the modern world is the ability to construct ever smaller devices out of silicon. At first, these devices were purely electronic—diodes, transistors, capacitors and the like. But more recently, engineers have carved light pipes, […]
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10:45 AM | How to Be Happy
Happiness is a tough one. We spend a lot of our time and billions of dollars trying to obtain happiness. Inevitably, though, we find ourselves back in the grind: dreading going to work, dreading doing the myriad errands and responsibilities it takes to live as a human being in this multifaceted world. The thing about […]
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9:11 AM | Maternal complement C1q and offspring psychosis
"In conclusion, exposure to maternal C1q activity during pregnancy may be a risk factor for the development of schizophrenia and psychosis in offspring". That was the primary observation made by Emily Severance and colleagues [1] at Johns Hopkins, extending their scientific interest in immune system involvement being potentially linked to psychiatry [2]."Serve the public trust, protect the innocent, uphold the law"I've already talked about Dr Severance's previous research forays into complement […]

Emily G. Severance, Kristin L. Gressitt, Stephen L. Buka, Tyrone D. Cannon & Robert H. Yolken (2014). Maternal complement C1q and increased odds for psychosis in adult offspring, Schizophrenia Research, Other:

Citation
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9:00 AM | The surprising origins of biological determinism: Tristram Shandy (1760s)!
It is only because of our very casual and cursory attention to history that we credit Charles Darwin, in 1858, with showing us that every aspect of our natures is due, entirely and with infinite determinism, to natural selection fine-tuning our genomes.  We like heroes and because we're scientists, we want the heroes to be other scientists (so we can liken ourselves, and our own inherent brilliance, to those heroes).  We dismiss philosophers and historians of science as meddlers in […]
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8:59 AM | Extremes report 2013: NZ drought and record Aussie heat made worse by warming
The latest climate extremes report finds that 9 out of 16 extreme weather events from last year were influenced by climate change. In particular, the conditions that led to New Zealand’s severe North Island drought — the worst for 41 years, estimated to have cost the economy NZ$1.3 billion — were made more likely by […]
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8:24 AM | Reverse Engineering Safety Offerings
Reverse Engineering Safety Offerings By Phil La Duke – see the whole article here Extracts: I don’t have all the answers; not about safety and not about anything else. Furthermore, as much as it may seem to the contrary, I don’t even THINK that I have all the answers, but there are people in the […] The post Reverse Engineering Safety Offerings appeared first on Safety Risk Blog.
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8:00 AM | The Price of a Spherical Cow
The Value of Idealized Models I’m going to take some exception to something, again. Superficially, it might seem like a good thing if our theoretical models can match real-world data. But is it? If I succeed in making a computer spit out accurate numbers from a model that is too complex for my meagre mortal [...]
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8:00 AM | Redux: A Dead World at Sunset
This was first published in March of 2011. As winter descends upon the sub-Arctic once more, I revisit these moments of awe on a frozen lake. “It may not strike you as a marvel; it would not, perhaps, unless you were standing in the middle of a dead world at sunset, but that was where […]
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8:00 AM | Quotes from Andre Norton #IAN1
These are the contexts of the quotes tweeted from @sueannbowling between September 25 and October 1, 2014. The first six quotes are from Storm Over Warlock, by Andre Norton. “The improbable we do at once; the impossible takes a little longer.” Thorvald to Shann Lantee, but I think he is quoting something much older. “There […]
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7:23 AM | Ebola is in the U.S. Are we all going to die?
Yes, we are all going to die. But not from Ebola. The media and social networks are understandably abuzz with the news that an individual in Dallas has become the first U.S.-diagnosed case of the Ebola virus. Ebola has no vaccine or cure and is an exotic, foreign disease. Pop culture descriptions of its symptoms […]
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7:16 AM | What has nature ever done for us?
Anti-environmentalists and apathists often ask why bother to conserve nature – what does it do for us? Cue enthusiastic green arm-waving and heavy sighs from environmental scientists and ecologists who have faced this attitude their entire careers. Nature is undeniably important for the human race – we wouldn’t be here without plants fixing the sun’s energy into carbohydrates and producing oxygen as a by-product, we wouldn’t be able to grow any food to eat without […]
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6:50 AM | Following the Water: Edward Burtynsky’s Watermark
Water is the stuff of life on Earth. And perhaps beyond—when venturing to search for life beyond our planet, NASA has sought to ‘follow the water’. Indeed, researchers recently discovered the presence of bacteria in a lake sealed hundreds of … Continue reading »The post Following the Water: Edward Burtynsky’s Watermark appeared first on At the Interface.
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6:38 AM | Ebola in USA no reason for panic
In a press conference earlier today, the Centers for Disease Control (CDC) announced that the US has diagnosed its first case of Ebola, in a man who travelled from Liberia to Dallas, Texas, on the 20th of September. The man was asymptomatic while in transit and only developed symptoms around the 24th of September. He [...]
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6:31 AM | Opening the Gates to African food security
It’s a hard life being a small farmer in sub-Saharan Africa. About 200 million people in the region are poor and undernourished. Most of them are smallholder farmers in rural areas, who rely on agriculture as their main source of food and income. Part of the reason for their level of hardship is that the […]
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6:30 AM | Prison Officers as frontline mental health staff? Results of a prison-based ethnography
Andrew Shepherd summarises an ethnography from the United States, which explores the relationships between Prison Officers in Correctional Institutions and Prisoners with mental health problems. The post Prison Officers as frontline mental health staff? Results of a prison-based ethnography appeared first on The Mental Elf.
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6:26 AM | Tested In-Depth: iPhone 6 and iPhone 6 Plus
No summary available for this post.
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6:00 AM | Exclusive: Q&A with Jean-Pierre Bourguignon, president of the ERC, on its work to engage East Europe
The next meeting of the scientific council of the European Research Council (ERC) takes place – for the first time – in Zagreb, Croatia, this month (20-22 October 2014). I recently spoke to Jean-Pierre Bourguignon, who took over as president of the ERC in January, about what the ERC can do to improve research in East Europe. The ERC is the 1st pan-European funding body for frontier research, funding only the very best researchers and selecting them through rigorous, peer-reviewed... […]
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6:00 AM | Glutbusters: October 2014
Homegrown Garlic, Rosemary & Lemon Thyme by Susy Morris Well, that was the driest September since records began, and one of the warmest this century! Good news for the last of the summer crops; bad news for the gardener toting the watering can…. The warm weather means there’s still time to plant overwintering onions, so have a look at September’s advice on that topic. A true GlutBusters tip arrived in my inbox from Suttons this week, who recommend planting your onions […]
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5:15 AM | La deuda de la genética con Thomas D. Brock
Quien más quien menos ha experimentado alguna vez un momento “eureka”, ese instante de lucidez que, a modo de fogonazo, nos revela la solución a un problema cuando ya nos habíamos dado por vencidos. Para algunos científicos, desconectar y dejar … Continue reading →
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5:00 AM | Comments for second half of September 2014
For Dorothy Bishop, two peer reviewed papers a year means you’re “totally disconnected from mainstream science.”Science of the South examines which area has historic campus buildings statisically.
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4:59 AM | Severe periodontitis: affected 11% of the world population in 2010
The review represents some of the output of the 2010 Global Burden of Disease studies and finds that severe periodontitis is the 6th most prevalent disease affecting about 11% of adults worldwide.The prevalence increases gradually with age with a steep increase between the 3rd and 4th decades. The post Severe periodontitis: affected 11% of the world population in 2010 appeared first on The Dental Elf.
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4:30 AM | New study shatters established knowledge of the immune system
Danish scientists discovers how the immune system is activated to break down bacteria. The experiments disproves a prevalent established theory about the immune
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4:11 AM | Kurds Retake Syria-Iraq Border Crossing As U.K. Begins Bombing
Rabia, which Islamic State militants had held since this summer, was reclaimed by peshmerga fighters in a bloody urban battle. But ISIS fighters advanced on the Syria-Turkey border despite airstrikes.
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4:09 AM | Happy farmer, happy cow
To succeed with farm animals, you should enjoy yourself and be kind and calm. The result will be happy cows and more milk.
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4:01 AM | Parental Alienation and the Fight for Children’s Hearts and Minds
Parental alienation involves one parent spoiling the relationship between a child and the other parent in the absence of actual abuse or neglect. In both my personal and professional lives, I have seen many parents actively turn their children against the other parent in an effort to “keep them (the child) close,” and to undermine their child’s loving bond with the other parent. Although research has demonstrated that parental alienation has very negative effects on children […]
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