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ScienceSeeker is a central site for finding and following science news and discussion. We collect thousands of posts and articles from hundreds of science sources; we aim to be the most comprehensive science hub on the web.

If you have a science blog or other regularly-updated science site, we want it to be on ScienceSeeker.

You can easily register, find out if a site is already on ScienceSeeker, and submit a site if it isn't. An editor will visit the site to make sure it's really about science, then approve the account; all its posts will be added to our site and feeds.

Registration

To register, click on the Register link in the upper-right corner. You'll be given the option of entering a username and email address, or registering automatically using your Twitter account. Choose this option if you don't want a separate username and password for this site.

Once you register following the on-screen directions, you can login and change your settings, including uploading a photo, URL, and biography.

Submitting a site

Anyone can submit a new source to ScienceSeeker, even if they aren't the site's author. To submit a site, click on "Add Site" at the top of the page. Enter the URL of the site or the site's RSS or Atom feed. Add in all the remaining information on the following form. Make sure you select at least one category that describes the site's content. If you have a large number of sources to add to the system, please contact us to discuss a data upload.

If you want to be identified as an author of the site, check the relevant box. To verify that you can really post content to your site, ScienceSeeker will provide a code for you to put in a post on your site. Paste it in near the top of the most recent post on your feed (don't worry, the code is invisible to readers). Once you have added the code to your site, click on "Continue to the next step" and our system will visit the site to verify that the code is present. (If this doesn't work right away, give it a few minutes and try again. Sometimes it just takes a moment for the information to propagate)

Once your site is submitted, an editor will check it to verify your information and approve it, usually within 24 hours. It won't appear on our site until it has been approved.

Submit any blog or other science site using our bookmarklet!

The ScienceSeeker bookmarklet makes it easy to add new sources to ScienceSeeker. It is meant to be useful for network managers, as well as interested users who want to add new science blogs, Tumblr feeds, or other science resources that they find. We encourage everyone to add more sources to our database!

  1. Make sure the "Bookmarks" toolbar is visible. In Firefox, you can select this toolbar under the "View -> Toolbars" menu.
  2. Drag this link onto the toolbar: Add blog to ScienceSeeker
  3. That's it! When you have navigated to a site's home page or an individual post page, click the "Add to ScienceSeeker" button to add that site to ScienceSeeker. You will be asked to select appropriate topics from a list (such as "Astronomy" or "Academic Life"), but the rest of the process is automatic.

Claiming a site

You claim a blog or other site to indicate that you are an author of that site. You can submit and claim a site at the same time. Or if someone else submitted your site, you can claim it later.

To see if your site is in our system, log in and click on "Index" and look for your blog in the list (it's in alphabetical order). You can also search for you blog by name (type the title in the "search title" box and click on "Blogs"). Click on the plus sign to see your options, then "Claim this site" to claim yours.

To verify that you can really post content to your site, ScienceSeeker will provide a code for you to put in a post on your site. Paste it in near the top of the most recent post on your feed (don't worry, the code is invisible to readers). Once you have added the code to your site, click on "Continue to the next step" and our system will visit the site to verify that the code is present. (If this doesn't work right away, give it a few minutes and try again. Sometimes it just takes a moment for the information to propagate.)

If your name does not appear in the list of authors, it may be because you haven't posted recently to the site. Our system can only detect authors who have posts in your syndication feed.

Using citations

Our citation generator will allow you to generate a citation that you can add to your posts for reference and aggregation here and with other services that use the industry-standard COinS system for citation of peer-reviewed research.

To create citations:

  1. Go to our citations generator.
  2. Use the title, ID or other keywords from the article you want to cite to search for it, or choose to create a citation manually.
  3. Our system will search online databases to find your citation, if you don't find it on the list of results, you can modify your search or create the citation manually.
  4. You will be able to modify each part of the citation before generating the final result.
  5. The final step will show you a preview of your citation with the HTML code below, you can copy this code to an HTML-enabled form to display your citation.

Using Tags

ScienceSeeker organizes information in two different ways. Topics are the general subject areas that each source site uses. Each site can have two topics. For example, the Bipolar Beat blog is categorized under "Psychology."

Tags are used to categorize individual posts. For example, Bipolar Beat usually makes posts that are more specific than just the general topic of "Psychology", and ScienceSeeker captures all the tags that the blogger used to categorize the post. Click on the "..." icon next to any post on our site to see the post profile page, and you will see a list of all the tags the author added to the post. For this post, the authors also tagged it with "Career," "disability", "bipolar disorder", "social security disability" and "ticket to work." Click on any of those tags to see a list of all posts from every source on ScienceSeeker using that tag.

Note: Any tag that starts with a Capital Letter is actually a Topic, and will bring up all posts from sources using that topic in addition to individual posts using the tag.

You can also add your own tags to a post.

  • Log in to ScienceSeeker
  • Click on the icon for the post you want to tag
  • Click the "+ Add Tag" button.
  • Add the tag you would like in the dialog that appears.
  • Choose "Public" if you want everyone to see the tag, and "Private" if the tag is just for your personal use.

Using Groups

Groups are a powerful tool for following and sharing posts about topics that interest you most. You can create, follow, and edit groups, and soon we will add even more ways to interact through groups.

  • To see the most recently-formed groups, click on the Groups tab at the top of the ScienceSeeker home page
  • Clicking on a group name will show you the most recent items from that group, let you know who manages the group, and shows you the tags that apply to the group. For example, the group "Some big bang posts" tracks posts with the tag "big bang."
  • If you are logged in to your ScienceSeeker account, you can recommend, comment on, or follow the group by clicking on the appropriate link at the top of the group page.
  • To create your own group, Login and hover over your user name to bring up a menu. Click on the "My Groups" link.
  • Type the name of your group and a description.
  • Click on "Create Group".
  • Add the tags you would like this group to track. You can use tags you create, or official ScienceSeeker topics. When you type in a topic name it will appear capitalized, and will bring up both individual posts with that tag and all posts for sources categorized with that topic.
  • Optionally you can upload an image to serve as the header for the group. Important: The image must be at least 1000 x 125 pixels. You can crop larger images to correct size, but smaller images will not work.
  • To modify or delete a group, click on the "+" sign next to the group name in your list under "my groups".

Creating a network group

  1. Go to My Groups.
  2. Select the name of your group and a description for it, then check the option "This is a blog network" and click on "Create Group".
  3. On the next page, it will ask you to create a unique tag for your group, this tag will be used on all the sites that are part of the blog network.
  4. Below you should copy the base URL of the blog network, this is the address that all blogs on the network share by being on the same domain, with this, our system finds all the matches in our database and allows you to quickly tag all the relevant results.
  5. The next page allows you to upload a banner that will be displayed in your group's profile page.
  6. That's it, the group has been created, you can go back to My Groups to change its setting.

If you are a network manager but your network is already on the system, or if you have a list of new sites to add to our database, you can contact us.

Following us on Social Media

ScienceSeeker is active on Twitter, Facebook, and Google+. Here's how to follow us:

  • The official ScienceSeeker Twitter account gives news about the site, notable science posts, and alerts Twitter followers to new posts on the ScienceSeeker Blog.
  • Our Facebook page gives updates on site news and highlights interesting content found on ScienceSeeker
  • Our updates on Google+ keep users informed of fascinating new developments in science and also give updates on the site.

Additional questions

If your question isn't answered here, contact us. We'll get back to you as soon as possible.